Saudi Arabia appears to threaten Canada with 9/11-style attack

Posted August 08, 2018

"It's estimated to be about 100,000 (barrels per day), and that's down over the past two years", McTeague said of Saudi Arabia's oil exports to Canada.

In the statement, the ministry said, "Oman is following the current political situation between Saudi Arabia and Canada and affirms its position of not interfering in the internal affairs of other countries".

It is unclear what, if any, implications the move has for existing trade ties between the two countries.

But Trudeau's Liberal government has also come under fire for approving a $15 billion (Canadian) arms deal to Saudi Arabia, which includes "heavy assault" vehicles, signed under his Conservative predecessor Stephen Harper.

Another trader said: "This is to me clearly part of the diplomatic dispute between Saudi Arabia and Canada, there is no other reason".

And they sent that tweet, which, given the very strong case that people in the Saudi government helped make 9/11 happen, is pretty bonkers.

Many Saudis went onto suggest that Canada should mind its own business in handling their local crisis, or help the indigenous women of Canada instead of interfering in Saudi Arabia.

Saudi neighbours Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates have voiced solidarity with Riyadh, according to media reports.

Saudi Arabia is pulling thousands of Saudi students out of Canada in retaliation after a Canadian official criticized the country's human rights record.

Prince Mohammed, heir to the region's most powerful throne, has introduced a string of reforms such as lifting a decades-long ban on women drivers in a bid to overhaul the kingdom's austere image. "They are the best interlocutor for Canada in the region", he said.

The news dominated the worldwide headlines and social media, especially in Saudi Arabia, where Saudis launched an Arabic hashtag "السعوديه_تطرد_السفير_الكندي" that literally translates to: "Saudi Arabia expels Canadian ambassador".

Ms Badawi is known for challenging Saudi Arabia's male guardianship system. "If you want to open up your country to the world, you don't start expelling ambassadors and freezing trade with countries such as Canada", said Joost Hiltermann, regional program director for the International Crisis Group. In 2014, the Canadian unit of US weapons maker General Dynamics Corp (GD.N) won a contract worth up to $13 billion to build light-armored vehicles for Saudi Arabia, in what Ottawa said was the largest advanced manufacturing export win in Canadian history.