FDA Approves First Drug Derived From Marijuana Plant

Posted June 27, 2018

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a marijuana-deriveddrug for the treatment of two rare and serious forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, that begin in childhood but can persist in adulthood.

The drug is derived from the cannabidiol of cannabis, and, as the plant is yet to be decriminalized by federal regulators, its approval gives GW Pharma a lead among cannabis-exposed companies in the USA financial markets.

More research is still necessary for medical professionals to draw any firm conclusions about CBD's potential to treat seizure conditions.

The drug, Epidiolex, will be used to treat seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) or Dravet syndrome in patients two years of age or older.

"The DEA will need to make a different scheduling decision for CBD.because it now has an accepted medical use", he said during a conference call with reporters.

"This is an important medical advance", Gottlieb said to STAT.

Aside from Epidiolex, GW Pharma also sells Sativex-which includes components of marijuana-in 30 countries as a treatment for multiple sclerosis-related spasticity. "This is the approval of one specific CBD medication for a specific use", Gottlieb said.

"This is clearly a breakthrough drug for an bad disease", John Mendelson, a panel member and senior scientist at the Friends Research Institute, said at a public FDA meeting this spring that was called to discuss the scientific merits of the drug. The company expects this to happen in the next 90 days.

The FDA still hasn't given its blanket approval to marijuana as a "safe and effective drug", though it has OK'd three medications that contain synthetic compounds similar to those found in the marijuana plant.

The drug has been shown to reduce seizures and return a few children to near-normal function.

But before the medicine can hit the market in those areas, the Drug Enforcement Administration must reclassify marijuana, now a Schedule I drug, along with heroin and Ecstasy, that is described as a substance with "no now accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse". Rescheduling cannabidiol paves the way for other advanced cannabinoid formulations, like the ones now being researched and developed by scientists on staff at my Colorado-based cannabinoid science business, ebbu. The floodgate effect is known as "sea change", as described by Barbara Carreno, public affairs officer for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

"In my practice, I often see patients with these highly treatment-resistant epilepsies who have tried and failed existing therapies and are asking about CBD", Devinsky said.

He added: "We anticipated that Epidiolex will be the first of many potential FDA-approved medicines based on the cannabis plant". Before the panel meeting, FDA staff also backed the drug in their own report, saying the company offered "substantial evidence" of efficacy. Another 20 states allow medical marijuana, but the US government continues to classify it as a controlled substance with no medical use, in the same category as heroin and LSD.