Ibuprofen Use Linked to Male Infertility, New Study Suggests

Posted January 10, 2018

Bernard Jégou, co-author and director of the Institute of Research in Environmental and Occupational Health in France, and a team of French and Danish researchers, began by exploring the health effects of pregnant women taking any of the 3 most common OTC pain relievers: acetaminophen, aspirin, and ibuprofen.

The widely-used over-the-counter painkiller ibuprofen may pose a threat to male fertility, suggests a small new study.

Despite the results, a lecturer says casual use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) by men should be just fine.

Separate experiments in the study using human testicular tissue in a lab dish also suggested that ibuprofen could affect testosterone production.

Men who dream of starting a family may want to pass on the ibuprofen the next time they have a headache. The painkiller users could potentially face prolonged low testosterone levels after the body loses its ability to compensate, leading to a host of health conditions including muscle weakness and loss, low fertility, and other issues.

The research focused on men given 600mg of ibuprofen twice a day, which isn't the norm for the average bloke.

However, because the study is small, more research is needed to confirm the results.

Common brands of ibuprofen include Advil and Motrin.

The safety and efficacy of active ingredients in these products has been well documented and supported by decades of scientific study and real-world use.
Before he stepped down in November 2016 he asked players about their use of over-the-counter painkillers and found that almost half of those who played in the past three World Cups took anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, every day.

Clinically, this condition is called "compensated hypogonadism"-"hypogonadism" because the body probably isn't producing testosterone at the appropriate rate, and "compensated" because other hormones have kicked in and gotten testosterone levels to increase. The remaining 17 volunteers were given a placebo.

"Our immediate concern is for the fertility of men who use these drugs for a long time", study co-author David Møbjerg Kristensen, of the University of Copenhagen, told The Guardian.

To avoid these side-effects, doctors caution against taking Ibuprofen for more longer than ten days in a row, per the FDA's warning.

The hormonal imbalance caused compensated hypogonadism, which is a condition linked to decreased male fertility, depression, and an increased risk of heart attack or stroke.