Trump declares North Korea a state sponsor of terror

Posted November 21, 2017

North Korea's state-run Minju Joson newspaper ran an editorial which said: "A load of rubbish spouted by the old lunatic Trump during his recent visit to South Korea was a total nonsense and paradox so far". Trump and North Korea leader Kim Jong Un have been engaged in an ongoing war of words for the past several months of its long-range missile tests and nuclear program.

Some members of Congress had been pushing for years for North Korea to be put back on the list, but others questioned whether the reclusive regime met the criteria of actively sponsoring global terrorism.

Experts say the designation will be largely symbolic, as North Korea is already heavily sanctioned by the United States.

"In addition to threatening the world by nuclear devastation, North Korea repeatedly supported acts of global terrorism including assassinations on foreign soil", Trump said.

Trump's announcement came before a Cabinet meeting at the White House. Also, it warns that it faces the hostility and the threats of the joint military exercises of the United States and the Republic of Korea in the Korean Peninsula.

United Nations spokesperson Farhan Haq said the UN has "nothing to say" about the U.S. designation of North Korea as a state sponsor of terrorism.

Trump made the announcement one week after returning from a trip to South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines.

Putting North Korea back on the USA list of state sponsors of terror ups the ante in Trump and Kim Jong-un's public battle, which has sometimes veered toward the personal.

At the request of Warmbier's family, six Democratic and six Republican senators later urged the State Department to consider reinstating North Korea to the list. He also mentions multiple North Korean assassinations and assassination plots, including the killing of Kim Jong Nam, Kim's half brother, who was poisoned earlier this year at a Malaysian airport.

Returning North Korea to the terror list would mean it is subject to greater restrictions on US foreign assistance, defense exports and sales, and other financial transactions. Cuba had been on the list but was removed by President Barack Obama in 2015.

Bush chose to remove North Korea from the list as part of a bid to save a nuclear deal with the country.

"The North Korean regime must be lawful", the president declared.