Lavrov hints US-Russia 'Tit-for-tat' could end

Posted September 24, 2017

"When I asked Rex Tillerson how his words, that the Russian interference in U.S. election is well documented, can be proved, he said that he could not show me anything because that was classified information".

"In about a year of this chaos about the so-called interference of Russian Federation into the elections, we never heard not a single fact", Lavrov told reporters in NY. And he said with so many people involved in hearings and investigations related to the alleged Russian meddling, "it can not be that not a single fact has leaked".

But he said relations are suffering because former president Barack Obama's administration "put this time bomb in U.S".

Beijing's diplomatic spokesman Lu Kang said Tuesday that China places value on the September 19 joint statement of the six-party talks, South Korean news agency Yonhap reported.

As a result, "the enormous potential of our bilateral relations" isn't being realized and global issues aren't being solved because the US and Russian Federation can not coordinate, he said. "They did it, and that's the reality we live in".

In his UN General Assembly speech on Tuesday, Trump called the nuclear accord as a one-sided "embarrassment" to the United States that he said his country may abandon.

He added, "We believe that all relevant nations can go back to the principles and spirit of the joint statement and look for a solution to the nuclear issue on the peninsula". Commenting on the matter, Russian foreign ministry spokesperson Maria Zakharova had said: "We must consider that foreign intervention on an internal matter of a sovereign country could threaten communal harmony there". He added that U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has talked about mediation and said if he received such a request "he would try to fulfill that". It would halt North Korean nuclear and missile tests in exchange for the US and South Korea stopping their joint military exercises, but the Trump administration has rejected it.

But Trump's threats to tear up the deal, which relieved some sanctions on Iran in exchange for a halt to nuclear development, make any sort of negotiated deal with North Korea all the more unlikely, Lavrov noted.

Iran has said it would not be the first to violate the landmark nuclear deal, but that it would respond "decisively and resolutely" to a violation of the pact "by any party".