United Nations warns Gulf states to respect rights in Qatar row

Posted June 15, 2017

Several major Middle Eastern states, including Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain have severed diplomatic ties with Qatar last week, accusing the monarchy of sponsoring terrorist groupings and meddling in neighbors' domestic affairs.

Qatar, which imported 80 percent of its food from bigger Gulf Arab neighbours before the diplomatic shutdown, has been talking to Iran and Turkey to secure food and water. Al Thani said during his European tour that the state of Qatar does not accept any interference, according to state-owned Qatar News Agency.

He also called it anti-Islamic.

Commenting on the blockade imposed by the neighboring Gulf states and Egypt, Al Baker accused Bahrain and the UAE of illegally blocking the airspace that does not belong to them but to the global community.

"We had a decision to make", Trump said, describing conversations with Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries.

The Arab states accused Qatar of supporting terrorism, an allegation Doha has denied.

"Maybe someone in Congress should have a hearing and just say, you know, 'Should we consider moving it?'" Al Otaiba said on Tuesday as quoted by The Hill newspaper. Qatar also hosts around 10,000 USA troops, as well as the forward headquarters of the military's Central Command that's conducting air campaigns in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria.

"The Qatar Charity implements projects included in the United Nations -coordinated Humanitarian Response Plans in Yemen, in Syria, and in Iraq, where they also participate in the common humanitarian coordination structure", United Nations spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

Zeybekci also indicated he would meet officials from Booking.com on June 22, to discuss its activities. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the move was rooted in longstanding differences and urged the parties to resolve them.

But Saudi wants Pakistan to side with the kingdom, it said. The ministry said Qatar had been an "impartial diplomatic mediator" in the dispute between Djibouti and Eritrea, which led to armed clashes in 2010.

The three Gulf states' ban does not apply to aviation companies and aircraft not registered in Qatar and the three neighbouring countries, and which wish to cross their airspace to and from Qatar, they said.